Aerial coastlineDespite being so isolated, the future and fate of the Lake Tanganyika Basin could not be more connected to the rest of the world. Rich in natural resources, like oil and minerals, and a place of enormous environmental importance because it contains one fifth of the world’s fresh water, the lake exists at the nexus of several global struggles and is increasingly attracting the attention of outside interests ranging from multi-national energy and mining corporations to global powers. The lake region is home to millions of indigenous and displaced poor, spread across four countries: Democratic Republic of the Congo, Tanzania, Burundi and Zambia.

Recognizing the complexity of the region, the organization has mobilized itself to engage on policy, legislation and technologies that promote effective development, transparency and ensure the safety of Lake Tanganyika’s populations. We have begun to produce white papers and articles that highlight key issues, provide objective analysis, and name specific opportunities and risks that decision makers should know about.  Earlier this year, we released “From Curse to Cure: A Special Report on the Impact of Energy Exploration & Production in the Lake Tanganyika Basin”  to expose the vulnerability of the Lake Tanganyika watershed and ensure it is properly protected—as the ecological health of the lake is inextricably tied to the health of the people living along its shores.  Download the paper here >>

We are bringing new ways of working, new thinking and new energy to one of the most neglected, yet important places on Earth. Watch footage of our efforts here >>


Latest News

  • LTFHC’s Study on Bed Net Misuse Featured in New York Times

    NYT Video

    As part of our ongoing work in the Lake Tanganyika Basin, we were so glad to serve as a resource to journalist Jeffrey Gettleman in preparation of his article, “Meant to Keep Malaria Out, Mosquito Nets Are Used to Haul Fish In,” featured in The New York Times. Anticipating its release, our team has been in active contact with many of the foundations, businesses, and multi-lateral organizations cited in this piece.  Given the incredible value – and thus importance – of bed nets as a tool in reducing malaria incidence, but also recognizing the tens of millions of Africans that rely on fish for survival, the LTFHC views this as an opportunity to continue to sharpen efforts that save lives while also promoting the welfare of those affected.  The LTFHC wholly agrees with Bill & Melinda Gates, who have stated for years “that all people have the right to live a healthy and productive life.”  As such, our efforts will now shift from helping ‘shine a light’ to helping solve a fixable problem.

    Read LTFHC’s initial study on bed net misuse published in Malaria Journal here >>

    For quick facts & figures about Lake Tanganyika, click here >>

     


Experiencing Lake Tanganyika

Complexity of the region

Complexity of the region

Water-based concept

Water-based concept

Using the Lake as the highway

Using the Lake as the highway