Aerial coastlineDespite being so isolated, the future and fate of the Lake Tanganyika Basin could not be more connected to the rest of the world. Rich in natural resources, like oil and minerals, and a place of enormous environmental importance because it contains one fifth of the world’s fresh water, the lake exists at the nexus of several global struggles and is increasingly attracting the attention of outside interests ranging from multi-national energy and mining corporations to global powers. The lake region is home to millions of indigenous and displaced poor, spread across four countries: Democratic Republic of the Congo, Tanzania, Burundi and Zambia.

Recognizing the complexity of the region, the organization has mobilized itself to engage on policy, legislation and technologies that promote effective development, transparency and ensure the safety of Lake Tanganyika’s populations. We have begun to produce white papers and articles that highlight key issues, provide objective analysis, and name specific opportunities and risks that decision makers should know about.  Earlier this year, we released “From Curse to Cure: A Special Report on the Impact of Energy Exploration & Production in the Lake Tanganyika Basin”  to expose the vulnerability of the Lake Tanganyika watershed and ensure it is properly protected—as the ecological health of the lake is inextricably tied to the health of the people living along its shores.  Download the paper here >>

We are bringing new ways of working, new thinking and new energy to one of the most neglected, yet important places on Earth. Watch footage of our efforts here >>


Latest News

  • Announcing WAVE’s next policy paper: Water-based Health Care, Have We Missed the Boat?

    People on shorelineWe are pleased to share with you the executive summary of our forthcoming white paper, “Water-based Health Care: Have We Missed the Boat?”

    Our purpose in publishing this paper is to introduce the concept of “water-based communities” and the unique interventions they require. Many do not realize that 40% of the world’s population resides within 100 kilometers of a coastline, with inland waterways containing some of the world’s most vulnerable populations. In doing so, we hope to reset the way the humanitarian and development communities view traditional health care delivery systems with respect to these communities, and to introduce a more water-centric, locally connected, and sustainable model.

    We look through the lens of the Lake Tanganyika Basin to highlight the challenges water-based communities face, and how a redesigned health system using our proposed principles could positively impact water-centric populations all over the world.

    Our concept of a regional hospital ship is the organizing principle to create a functional health care system in the Lake Tanganyika Basin. The full paper, due out later this year, describes our systems building approach using a regional hospital ship as a method of transport and supply chain access, and as a culturally appropriate, patient-centric, water-based facility to meet the needs of water-based communities.

    We appreciate your continued support as we bring new ways of working, new thinking, and new energy to this neglected region.


Experiencing Lake Tanganyika

Complexity of the region

Complexity of the region

Water-based concept

Water-based concept

Using the Lake as the highway

Using the Lake as the highway